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Critical Reasoning: Assumption Questions

The Daisygen Company genetically engineers flowers which are then sent to retailers in locations around the world. By splicing a rose with a species of onion they managed to create a flower that looks like the classic, and still very popular, red rose, but that takes much longer to wilt. A longer expiration period presents an important advantage to international flower importers and to individual consumers. Clearly, sales of the Daisygen rose will outnumber those of the original rose species.

Which of the following is an assumption underlying the conclusion?

Incorrect.

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This answer choice repeats information that is presented by the premise in sentence 3: an important advantage to international flower importers and to individual consumers. If this data is a given, the author does not need to assume it.

Incorrect.

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This answer choice presents a new premise about an unrelated topic - plastic flowers. The comparisons being made by the author are between a genetically engineered rose and a natural one. Any other form of flower is beyond the scope of the argument.

What you are looking for is the assumption, which should explain how the author drew the conclusion based on the existing premise.

Incorrect.

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This answer choice presents a new premise because it introduces all flower species into the discussion. The comparisons being made by the author are between a genetically engineered rose and a natural one. It is irrelevant whether any other species of flower sells better than the rose.

What you are looking for is the assumption, which should explain how the author drew the conclusion based on the existing premise.

Incorrect.

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This answer choice presents a new premise about the advantages of the new flower to importers. The fact that this new data may support the conclusion is irrelevant; what you are looking for is the assumption, which should explain how the author drew the conclusion based on the existing premise.

Exactly right!

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This answer choice seems to come out of the blue, but it follows the general prediction of what the right answer should do: If the onion's tearing effect transferred to the new rose, then smelling the new rose wouldn't be very pleasant, and it would be incorrect to conclude that the sales of the new flower will outnumber those of the original rose. Thus, in order to reach the conclusion that the roses will be a hit, the author must assume that this difficulty will not manifest.

The genes which were spliced into the rose are not also responsible for the onion's tearing effect.
Consumers are interested in a flower that will last longer.
Plastic flowers have not affected the import and export of natural flowers.
Although extremely popular, the original rose was not the highest selling flower species of all.
A longer expiration period will allow importers more time for delivery of the Daisygen roses.