Don’t lose your progress!

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Up to 90+ points GMAT score improvement guarantee

The best guarantee you’ll find

Our Premium and Ultimate plans guarantee up to 90+ points score increase or your money back.

Master each section of the test

Comprehensive GMAT prep

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Schedule-free studying

Learn on the go

Study whenever and wherever you want with our iOS and Android mobile apps.

The most effective way to study

Personalized GMAT prep, just for you!

Adaptive learning technology focuses on your academic weaknesses.

Critical Reasoning: Boldface Type Questions

Spokesperson for Company Ex: Many residents of the area surrounding the Company Ex factory send written complaints to the newspapers, blaming the company for polluting the air and water. However, a recent survey shows that 95% of these residents do not comply with recycling laws. Company Ex, on the other hand, complies with current waste restrictions and is making an immense effort to reduce the effects of its byproduct on the environment. The residents should put more energy into the evaluation of their own waste management than into criticizing that of Company Ex.

In the argument given, the two portions in boldface play which of the following roles?

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]



The argument is not interested in explaining why 95% of the residents do not recycle. You can immediately eliminate answer choices that incorrectly define the first boldface part; do not waste time reading the rest.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]



The data presented by the first boldface portion does not challenge, but supports the argument's position. You can immediately eliminate answer choices that incorrectly define the first boldface part; do not waste time reading the rest.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]



The first boldface portion is factual information - a premise. It cannot, therefore, be referred to as a prediction. You can immediately eliminate answer choices that incorrectly define the first boldface part; do not waste time reading the rest.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

While this answer choice defines the first boldface part correctly, it defines the second incorrectly. The second boldface portion does not oppose the finding of the first portion, but instead uses it as a basis.

Terrific!

[[snippet]]



The first boldface portion is indeed evidence that supports the company's position by showing the residents in a negative light. The second boldface portion is a judgment of what the residents should do, i.e. mind their own business and leave company Ex alone.

The first is factual information that is used as evidence in support of the argument's position; the second is a judgment based on that position.
The first is a finding that the argument seeks to explain; the second is that explanation.
The first is data that challenges the argument's position; the second is a conclusion based on that position.
The first is a prediction that, if true, supports the argument's position; the second is that position.
The first is a finding that provides the basis for the argument's position; the second is a judgment that opposes this finding.