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Critical Reasoning: Argument Structure - Identifying the Conclusion by Recommendation

(1) Sure Enough Insurance is a large insurance company that has recently been dealing with financial difficulties. (2) Claims are handled by claims coordinators who determine how much, if at all, Sure Enough Insurance must pay the policy holder who made the claim. (3) The aforementioned financial difficulties are forcing Sure Enough Insurance to fire 25% of its claim coordinators. (4) To minimize the potentially harmful effects of these cuts, it is recommended that Sure Enough Insurance lay off coordinators whose average time of completing work on their assigned claims is the longest.

Which sentence includes the argument's conclusion?

Sentence 1 is a premise. It provides factual data that's considered true.

Sentence 2 is a premise. It provides factual data that's considered true.

Sentence 3 is a premise. It provides factual data that's considered true.

Well done!

Sentences 1 and 2 are premises.

Sentences 1 and 3 are premises.

Sentences 2 and 3 are premises.

Sentences 1, 2 and 3 are premises.

Hmmm, remember that not ALL Critical Arguments include a conclusion. There are arguments that consist only of premises. The key to identifying the conclusion in sentence 4 is that this sentence includes a recommendation.

Oh boy - that's a far cry from the real reason why sentence 4 is the conclusion. The conclusion does not always appear in the last sentence of the argument. It can appear at the beginning of the argument, in the middle of the argument, or in the end.

The clue to identifying the conclusion in sentence 4 is the recommendation that appears in it. A recommendation is a dead giveaway for a conclusion.

Very good!

The key to identifying the conclusion in sentence 4 is that this sentence includes a recommendation.

Why do you think the conclusion is in sentence 4?

Sentence 1
Sentence 2
Sentence 3
Sentence 4
Sentences 1 and 2
Sentences 1 and 3
Sentences 1 and 4
Sentences 2 and 3
Sentences 2 and 4
Sentences 3 and 4
Sentences 1, 2 and 3
Sentences 1, 2 and 4
sentences 2, 3 and 4
It's not in the first 3 sentences, so I assume it must be in this sentence.
Sentence 4 is the last sentence, and the conclusion is always in the last sentence of the argument.
Sentence 4 includes a recommendation, which is a clue to identifying the conclusion.

I don't know