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Sentence Correction: Relative Clauses - Choosing the Correct Relative Pronoun

Fernande Olivier was an artist who Picasso met in 1904 during the Rose Period, which is characterized by images of acrobats, harlequins, and other circus people.

This answer choice is grammatically incorrect. The relative clause who Picasso met in 1904 during the Rose Period describes the noun immediately before it, namely, artist. The artist is not the subject of the relative clause - Picasso is. The artist is the object of the relative clause: Picasso met the artist. In such cases, the correct relative pronoun is whom, not who.

What helps us identify this question as a Relative Clause question as well as identify the mistake is the following Stop Sign:

who, which, that, whose, whom

This answer choice is grammatically incorrect and repeats the original Relative Clause error. The relative clause who Picasso met in 1904 during the Rose Period describes the noun immediately before it, namely, artist. The artist is not the subject of the relative clause - Picasso is. The artist is the object of the relative clause: Picasso met the artist. In such cases, the correct relative pronoun is whom, not who.

What helps us identify this question as a Relative Clause question as well as identify the mistake is the following Stop Sign:

who, which, that, whose, whom

While this answer choice corrects the original Relative Clause error by replacing who with whom, it is grammatically incorrect. The first two items in the list at the end of the sentence are nouns (acrobats, harlequins), but the last item is a verb (shows).

What helps us identify this question as a Parallelism question as well as identify the mistake is the following Stop Sign:

A list of 3 items or more, separated by commas and and/or before the last item.

Good!

The relative clause who Picasso met in 1904 during the Rose Period describes the noun immediately before it, namely, artist. In such cases, the correct relative pronoun is whom, not who.

While this answer choice corrects the original Relative Clause error by replacing who with whom, it is grammatically incorrect. The first and last items in the list at the end of the sentence are nouns (harlequins, circus people), but the middle item is an adjective (acrobatic).

What helps us identify this question as a Parallelism question as well as identify the mistake is the following Stop Sign:

A list of 3 items or more, separated by commas and and/or before the last item.

who Picasso met in 1904 during the Rose Period, which is characterized by images of acrobats, harlequins, and other circus people

whom Picasso met in 1904 during the Rose Period, which is characterized by images of harlequins, acrobatic, and other circus people

whom Picasso met in 1904 during the Rose Period, which is characterized by images of acrobats, harlequins, and other circus people

whom Picasso met in 1904 during the Rose Period, which is characterized by images of acrobats, harlequins, and shows other circus people

who, in 1904, Picasso met during the Rose Period, which is characterized by images of acrobats, harlequins, and other circus people