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Sentence Correction: Subject Verb Agreement Questions - Overview

Jane, who works 80 hours a week, and John, who goes on business trips abroad almost every week, hardly sees the children.

Excellent!

This answer choice corrects the Subject Verb Agreement mistake in the original sentence by changing the singular verb sees to the plural verb have seen, to match the plural subject Jane...and John.

Incorrect.

This answer choice repeats the original Subject Verb Agreement mistake. The plural subject Jane... and John... does not agree with the singular verb sees.

Two Stop Signs identify this question as a subject verb agreement question and help us detect the mistake:

- A plural subject made up of singular nouns connected by and

- A long complex subject / long distance between subject and verb

Also, this answer choice doesn't fit into the original sentence as a result of adding the word since at the beginning of the underlined section. 

Incorrect.

Although this answer choice changes the verb sees to has seen, it still repeats the original Subject Verb Agreement mistake, because sees and has seen are both singular verbs. It also creates a new mistake by changing the singular verb goes to the plural go. The singular subject John does not agree with the plural verb go

While this answer choice corrects the original Subject Verb Agreement mistake and is grammatically correct, it is stylistically flawed. Adding the word ever after hardly creates redundancy since hardly and hardly ever practically mean the same.

Did you notice the addition of the word ever?

Paying closer attention to details is your lesson, then. Changes in the sentence may not always revolve around the original mistake.

Did you go over the remaining answer choices or stopped after this one?

This is a mistake. Remember that in Sentence Correction, we do not choose a correct answer but rather eliminate four incorrect answer choices and choose the last one standing.

We begin by going over the answer choices vertically, not reading them from beginning to end but rather focusing on the part which was originally flawed (in this question, the verb sees). We eliminate answer choices that repeat the original mistake (in this case, answer choices A, C and D).

After eliminating the answer choices that repeat the original mistake, we look at the remaining answer choices carefully, comparing them word for word. This means that you have to read answer choices B, and E carefully and eliminate one of them. 

Good! That's what you should have done.

Well, that's good that you noticed, but this change is also significant. Next time, avoid picking an answer choice where you suspect there is a redundancy, until you have gone over and eliminated the other answer choices. 

Incorrect.

This answer choice is grammatically incorrect. The plural subject Jane... and John... does not agree with the singular verb sees.

Two Stop Signs identify this question as a subject verb agreement question and help us detect the mistake:

- A plural subject made up of singular nouns connected by and

- A long complex subject / long distance between subject and verb

John, who goes on business trips abroad almost every week, hardly sees
John, who goes on business trips abroad almost every week, hardly ever see
John, who go on business trips abroad almost every week, hardly has seen
since John goes on business trips abroad every week, hardly sees
John, who goes on business trips abroad almost every week, have hardly seen
Yes
No
I went over the remaining answer choices.
I stopped after this one because I thought I had found the correct answer and didn't want to waste time.