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Critical Reasoning: Paradox Questions

The GMAT is written in English. However, the average score of native English speakers is below 550, which is considered a relatively low score on a scale of 200-800.

Which of the following does LEAST to resolve the above paradox?

Incorrect.

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This answer choice does resolve the paradox because as perfect as one's English may be, if one does not possess strong analytical skills and logic, one will not do well on the GMAT.

Incorrect.

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This answer choice does resolve the paradox. It does so by adding a factor relevant to testees' success on the GMAT other than their mastery of the English language: speed. Thus, slow test takers, no matter how perfect their English is, will not get a high score on the GMAT because they will run out of time before seeing all the questions or will have to select answers before they have had enough time to think about the question.

Incorrect.

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This answer choice does resolve the paradox as it tells us that one section of the GMAT has little to do with English language mastery. Thus, the fact that one is a native English speaker is far from being enough to get a high score in the quantitative section, and therefore in the test as a whole.

Incorrect.

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This answer choice does resolve the paradox as it states that scores are calculated not only on the basis of testees' performance but also on the basis of their relative scores to one another. Thus, on a scale of 200-800, The average score in case of a normal distribution is 500 - lower than 550.

Well done!

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This answer choice does nothing to resolve the paradox. The argument deals with native English speakers who may be British, Australian, South African, Canadian etc. The fact that 60% of the test-takers are American cannot help resolve the paradox that native English speakers don't necessarily get very high grades on the GMAT. Since the question asks for the answer choice that does LEAST to resolve the paradox, this is the correct answer.

The GMAT does not test English knowledge but skills such as analytical skills and logic.
The GMAT includes a quantitative section, which tests mathematical skills.
GMAT scores are calculated to create a bell-shaped normal Gaussian distribution, so scores are relative to others' performance.
The GMAT has a severe time limit, and for many test takers, time ends before they have solved all the questions.
About 60% of GMAT test-takers are American.