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Reading Comprehension Questions: Overview

In Reading Comprehension, it is strongly recommended to work at the _____ level. This means we never read more than one _____ at a time.

Very good!

The common mistake that novice test takers do is read the passage as quickly as possible in order to save time. However, moving from one sentence to the other without retaining anything is the worst thing you can do - you will end up wasting time by reading the same parts of the passage again and again, and will still have no confidence in your choice of the correct answer choice.

The correct method is to pause after each and every sentence in the initial reading, and ask yourself - "what have I just read? What have I just learned? How does this connect with everything else I've read so far in the passage?". Build a mental picture of the passage from the initial reading, summarize it to yourself in your own simple words, THEN go to questions.

Incorrect.

First, you cannot read more than one passage at a time as you never see more than one passage on the screen. 

Second, you must never read an entire passage. Reading so much text takes a lot of time and is totally unnecessary. There are only 3-4 questions on each passage, so they cannot possibly cover the content of the entire passage

Finally, the human mind has limited capacity, and a GMAT reading passage far exceeds this capacity. 

Incorrect.

This is a very common misconception. A lot of GMAT students think that the paragraph is the smallest context unit. In other words, that they have to read a whole paragraph in order for the information they read to make sense. Otherwise, they feel they lack context or a frame of reference.

This is not true; at least not on the GMAT. Also, the human mind has limited short-term capacity and a paragraph exceeds this capacity. 

The correct method is to pause after each and every sentence in the initial reading, and ask yourself - "what have I just read? What have I just learned? How does this connect with everything else I've read so far in the passage?". Build a mental picture of the passage from the initial reading, summarize it to yourself in your own simple words, THEN go to questions.

Incorrect.

Throughout all the Verbal Section, we work at the same level, which is the sentence level. Words in themselves are not the issue. There are no vocabulary questions, for instance. The GMAT is about how things logically relate to one another.

This is true not just for Reading Comprehension but also for Sentence Correction and Critical Reasoning.

In the Sentence Correction section, the focus is on how the words in a sentence relate to each other.

In the Critical Reasoning section, the focus is on how the sentences in the argument relate to each other. for example, if a sentence begins with However, it means that its relation to the previous sentence is one of opposition.

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