Don’t lose your progress!

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Up to 90+ points GMAT score improvement guarantee

The best guarantee you’ll find

Our Premium and Ultimate plans guarantee up to 90+ points score increase or your money back.

Master each section of the test

Comprehensive GMAT prep

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Schedule-free studying

Learn on the go

Study whenever and wherever you want with our iOS and Android mobile apps.

The most effective way to study

Personalized GMAT prep, just for you!

Adaptive learning technology focuses on your academic weaknesses.

Data Sufficiency: Yes/No Basic Technique

If $$a$$, $$b$$, and $$i$$ are integers, is $$4(3b + 2) = 5a$$? >(1) If $$i$$ is divided by 5, then the quotient is $$a$$ and the remainder is 3. >(2) If $$i$$ is divided by 12, then the quotient is $$b$$ and the remainder is 11.
According to Stat. (1+2), >$$i = 5a + 3$$ >$$i = 12b + 11$$ Since they both equal $$i$$, you can set them equal to each other: >$$5a + 3 = 12b + 11$$. At this point, the fact that you see $$5a$$ should lead you to try to manipulate the equation to see if you can get $$5a = 4(3b+2)$$: >$$5a = 12b + 11 - 3$$ >$$5a = 12b + 8$$ >$$5a = 4(3b + 2)$$. Thus, the combination of the statements tells you that the equation in the question stem is always correct. That's a definite "Yes," so **Stat.(1+2) → Yes → S → C**.
Incorrect. [[snippet]] According to Stat. (1+2), >$$i = 5a + 3$$ >$$i = 12b + 11$$ Since they both equal $$i$$, you can set them equal to each other: >$$5a + 3 = 12b + 11$$. At this point, the fact that you see $$5a$$ should lead you to try to manipulate the equation to see if you can get $$5a = 4(3b+2)$$: >$$5a = 12b + 11 - 3$$ >$$5a = 12b + 8$$ >$$5a = 4(3b + 2)$$. Thus, the combination of the statements tells you that the equation in the question stem is always correct. That's a definite "Yes," so **Stat.(1+2) → Yes → S → C**.
Incorrect. [[snippet]] According to Stat. (1), >$$i = 5a + 3$$. Even if you find a definite value for $$a$$ from this equation, $$b$$ can have any value. There is no definite answer, so **Stat.(1) → No → IS → BCE**. According to Stat. (2), >$$i = 12b + 11$$. Even if you find a definite value for $$b$$ from this equation, $$a$$ can have any value. There is no definite answer, so **Stat.(2) → No → IS → CE**.
Incorrect. [[snippet]] According to Stat. (2), >$$i = 12b + 11$$. Even if you find a definite value for $$b$$ from this equation, $$a$$ can have any value. There is no definite answer, so **Stat.(2) → No → IS → ACE**.
Incorrect. [[snippet]] According to Stat. (1), >$$i = 5a + 3$$. Even if you find a definite value for $$a$$ from this equation, $$b$$ can have any value. There is no definite answer, so **Stat.(1) → No → IS → BCE**.
Correct. [[snippet]] According to Stat. (1), >$$i = 5a + 3$$. Even if you find a definite value for $$a$$ from this equation, $$b$$ can have any value. There is no definite answer, so **Stat.(1) → No → IS → BCE**. According to Stat. (2), >$$i = 12b + 11$$. Even if you find a definite value for $$b$$ from this equation, $$a$$ can have any value. There is no definite answer, so **Stat.(2) → No → IS → CE**.
Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but Statement (2) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.
Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but Statement (1) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.
BOTH Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question asked, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked.
EACH statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked.
Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question asked, and additional data specific to the problem are needed.
Continue