Don’t lose your progress!

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Up to 90+ points GMAT score improvement guarantee

The best guarantee you’ll find

Our Premium and Ultimate plans guarantee up to 90+ points score increase or your money back.

Master each section of the test

Comprehensive GMAT prep

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Schedule-free studying

Learn on the go

Study whenever and wherever you want with our iOS and Android mobile apps.

The most effective way to study

Personalized GMAT prep, just for you!

Adaptive learning technology focuses on your academic weaknesses.

Reading Comprehension: Application Questions

With which of the following statements would the author of the passage most likely agree?

Excellent!

[[snippet]]

The author says that the 1970s agrarian historians mentioned in the third paragraph convincingly make their arguments, which indicates that he or she agrees with their version of events.

The third paragraph provides several examples of how new farming techniques (that we may infer originated with the Europeans) were not suitable for the conditions in the Russian countryside or the conditions of Russian technological development at the time.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

This answer choice misrepresents the theory of the 1970s agrarian historians. Russian peasants did not use new European technologies because it was not suited to Russian conditions. This theory does not state that these technologies were not useful anywhere but Europe.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

This answer choice relies on Chayanov's first theory, however, there is no indication in the passage that the author agrees with it.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

This answer choice relies on Chayanov's second theory, the consumption-labor-balance principle. However, the author does not state or imply his or her agreement with this theory.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

This answer choice incorrectly describes Chayanov's second theory, the consumption-labor-balance principle. According to this theory, Russian peasants worked a certain amount of time each day according to the ratio of consumers to workers they had in the households, not that each household had a large number of consumers. In any case, there is no indication in the passage that the author agrees with Chayanov's theories, but rather evidence to the contrary - that he agrees with the theories presented in the third paragraph.

Russian peasants did not use European farming technologies and land-holding patterns because they did not fit the ecological requirements of the countryside and the state of the Russian peasants' technological development.
Russian peasants did not use European farming technologies and land-holding patterns because they were uniquely suited to European agricultural conditions and could not be effectively implemented elsewhere.
Russian peasants did not use European farming technologies and land-holding patterns because they were not willing to accept the individualistic behavior of peasants wishing to make more profits than their fellow villagers.
Russian peasants did not use European farming technologies and land-holding patterns because they were not willing to invest more energy and effort into their fields than required to provide minimal sustenance for their families.
Russian peasants did not use European farming technologies and land-holding patterns because they had large amount of consumers in their households, were afraid of government taxation and had few material needs.