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Critical Reasoning: Assumption Questions

Company X manufactures two radiator models: Nice'N'Warm and Some Like It Hot. John has the Nice'N'Warm model in his bedroom, and Jane has the Some Like It Hot model in her bedroom. Last winter, John and Jane turned on their radiators to maximum every night at 22:00 and turned them off at 07:00. The temperature in Jane's bedroom was eight degrees warmer than the temperature in John's bedroom. Clearly, the Some Like It Hot model is more effective than the Nice'N'Warm model.

Which of the following is an assumption underlying the argument above?

Incorrect.

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If the author thought Jane's room was smaller, he or she may not have attributed greater efficiency to Jane's radiator (smaller rooms heat up faster). This answer choice contradicts the conclusion, and therefore cannot be the assumption.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

This answer choice presents a new premise about the costs of radiators. However, what you should be looking for is the assumption that can explain how the author drew the conclusion based on the existing premises. Since radiator prices are not mentioned in the argument, a statement about such prices cannot logically link the premises to the conclusion.

Well done!

[[snippet]]

To reach the given conclusion, and to compare between the two radiators, the author must assume that the temperature before the radiators are turned on is the same. The assumption in this case is not a step linking the premises to the conclusions, but rather a necessary step without which the conclusion cannot be reached. If John lives in Siberia while Jane lives in Singapore, then Jane's room will be hotter regardless of the radiator effectiveness - C is a necessary assumption needed to state that the radiator is the cause of the difference, and not something else.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

John and Jane's sensitivity to the cold is irrelevant to this argument as it discusses real temperatures, not subjective feeling of warmth or cold. What you should be looking for is the assumption that can explain how the author drew the conclusion based on the existing premises.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

This answer choice repeats the information given by the first premise but does not identify the assumption made by the author, which should  explain how the author drew the conclusion based on the existing premises.

Jane's bedroom is smaller than John's bedroom.

The price of Nice'N'Warm is higher than the price of Some Like It Hot.

John and Jane live in areas with the same climate.
John is as sensitive to cold as Jane is.
Company X manufactures only two radiator models.