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Critical Reasoning: Argument Structure - Identifying the Premise without Clues

(1) People in the second half of the fourth decade of their lives purchase more chocolate than do people in any other age group. (2) The prevalent belief that children love chocolate more than adults do is thus at least inaccurate if not utterly wrong.

Which of the following best describes the argument's structure?

Very good!

The word thus characterizes a conclusion, which means that the sentence in which it appears is the argument's conclusion.

Does the word thus characterize a premise or a conclusion?

That's right.

The word thus indeed characterizes a conclusion, which means that the sentence in which it appears is the argument's conclusion.

Nope.

The word thus characterizes a conclusion, which means that the sentence in which it appears is the argument's conclusion.

That's impossible: an argument cannot consist of conclusions only. An argument must include at least one premise.

The word thus characterizes a conclusion, which means that the sentence in which it appears is the argument's conclusion.

Sentence 1 is a premise, and sentence 2 is a conclusion.
Sentence 1 is a conclusion, and sentence 2 is a premise.
Sentences 1 and 2 are both premises.
Sentences 1 and 2 are both conclusions.

I don't know

a premise
a conclusion

I don't know