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Reading Comprehension: Detail Function Questions

The author most likely quotes the phrase "the dog dirty" in order to

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

The passage states that the word be denotes habitual action, and therefore "the dog dirty" cannot fulfill this function.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

Although this quote is an example of AAVE speech, this is not its function in the sentence. We can see that there are several examples of AAVE speech in the passage, and they are each used to illustrate a certain concept.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

The passage states that AAVE usually omits the verb to be except in certain semantic purposes.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

Although this quote is an example of how AAVE omits the verb to be, this is not its function in the sentence. We can figure out its meaning by looking at the other quote, "the dog be dirty" and determining how and why the two are different.

Very good!

[[snippet]]

The passage shows an example of how AAVE uses the word be to show habitual action, and then shows the same sentence if the action were not habitual.

show how African American Vernacular English shows habitual action
contrast a situation in which African American Vernacular English shows habitual action with a situation in which it does not
provide an example of African American Vernacular English speech

show how African American Vernacular English omits the verb to be for certain semantic purposes

provide an example of how African American Vernacular English omits the verb to be in everyday speech