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Reading Comprehension: Inference Questions

The author suggests that in standard English, verbs in the present perfect tense

Good!

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We know that African American Vernacular English uses one word, been, to do the same thing as standard English verbs in the present perfect tense

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

Although we know from our knowledge of grammar that has been is in the present perfect tense, we cannot infer this information from the passage (nor is this fully correct - what about have been?).

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

Standard English's present perfect tense conveys the same information as its African American Vernacular English counterpart, been.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

Although in African American Vernacular English, the speaker uses been with no differentiation between the present perfect and past perfect tenses, this is not the case in Standard English.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

Although in African American Vernacular English, according to the passage, the verb been is all-encompassing, this is not the case regarding Present Perfect verbs in Standard English, which do not cover the same actions as, for instance, Past Perfect verbs.

consist of more than one word

always take the form has been

show action better than their African American Vernacular English counterpart
are interchangeable with verbs in the past perfect tense

are all-encompassing just like African American Vernacular English's been