Don’t lose your progress!

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Up to 90+ points GMAT score improvement guarantee

The best guarantee you’ll find

Our Premium and Ultimate plans guarantee up to 90+ points score increase or your money back.

Master each section of the test

Comprehensive GMAT prep

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Schedule-free studying

Learn on the go

Study whenever and wherever you want with our iOS and Android mobile apps.

The most effective way to study

Personalized GMAT prep, just for you!

Adaptive learning technology focuses on your academic weaknesses.

Reading Comprehension: Detail Function Questions

The author uses the words usually and certain to emphasize that

Good!

[[snippet]]

The words usually and certain indicate that, for some products, the life cycle described in this paragraph is not applicable, i.e., the life cycle is not universal.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

We know that the amount of success varies from product to product.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

Since the author advocates a model of product life cycle, it can be inferred he or she believes this model has some use in prediction of success. The author uses these words to qualify (i.e., to add a reservation to) his or her statements about the product life cycle, in other words, to warn that they are not perfect.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

Although we can infer from the sentence that some products do not succeed, the passage states that all companies conduct market research. Therefore, market research cannot be the reason that some products succeed and some do not.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

The author is always an expert on the topic of a GMAT passage. In this case, the author does not want to make any sweeping statements about business success, as not all businesses are the same.

the life cycle, as it is described in the first paragraph, is not universal
most products only enjoy a modest measure of commercial success
one cannot predict whether a product will be successful or not
companies that employ market research enjoy more success than those which do not
the author's knowledge of product life cycles is limited