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Reading Comprehension: Detail Questions

Which of the following facts about a classic argument of organizational theory is mentioned in the passage?

Good job!

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This answer choice links increased productivity, or creating more products in the least amount of time, with the eventual earning of higher wages, reflecting correctly the classic argument of organizational theory.

Incorrect.

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This answer choice summarizes the basic assumption of behind organizational theory, appearing in the first sentence, not a classic argument of organizational theory.

Incorrect.

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Although the passage links increased productivity with higher wages, it explicitly states that higher wages will be the long-term result.

Incorrect.

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The passage mentions that the result of increased productivity is increased wages. It does not mention anything about what will happen if productivity decreases.

Incorrect.

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The classic argument of organizational theory only mentions the interests of workers, not management. Watch out for distractors which make logical sense but use details not stated in the passage.

Workers and management will cooperate for the greater benefit of the firm.
Increased productivity will result in immediate higher wages for workers.
Both workers and management are interested in higher productivity, which results in higher wages.
The more efficiently workers make products, the higher the wages they will eventually earn.
Unless productivity is increased, wages will inevitably go down.