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Reading Comprehension: Detail Function Questions

The author refers to the correlation between higher earnings and higher education in order to point out

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

The fourth sentence of the second paragraph only tells us why a graduate tax would be fair to those who pay it, not how it will serve the interests of society.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

The passage is not concerned with individuals' financial planning.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

The passage is not concerned with competition on the job market.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

While the Initial Reading showed us that second paragraph is concerned with the financial logic of the graduate tax system, this is not the purpose of mentioning the correlation...between higher earnings and higher education. This point is mentioned in reference to a different focus of the second paragraph.

Excellent!

[[snippet]]

The third sentence of the second paragraph raises a possible objection to the fairness of the graduate tax, by mentioning that higher education may not be the sole factor contributing to higher earnings, and therefore some people might be taxed for a good from which they did not benefit. This objection undermines the moral validity of the proposed graduate tax.

The fourth sentence responds to this objection by implying that the correlation is good enough to show that such people would be exceptions to the rule, and that, therefore, successful graduates would be, by and large, fairly taxed by a graduate tax system.

society's vested interest in instituting a financing reform
how an individual may guarantee his or her future income
why university graduates compete more successfully on the job market
that exceptions to this rule do not undermine the moral validity of the proposed tax
the breadth of the future tax base that will become the backbone of higher education finance