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Sentence Correction: Sentence vs. Clause vs. Fragment

The State Hermitage, founded by Catherine the Great, comprises objects both exhibited on permanent display in the many galleries of the complex lining St. Petersburg's Palace Embankment, yet a vast number of its treasures have never been on view for the public.

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the original redundancy, it is grammatically incorrect. It creates a fragment, lacking a conjugated verb. By adding the relative pronoun which before comprises, this answer choice turns the remainder of the clause into a relative clause, but does not supply the clause's subject (The State Hermitage) with a verb.

In addition, this answer choice incorrectly uses the idiom both A and B. While both appears before the first item (both in permanent exhibitions...) there is neither and nor a parallel second item in the sentence.

Incorrect.

This answer choice is grammatically incorrect; it incorrectly uses the idiom both A and B. While both appears before the first item (both exhibited on permanent display...) there is neither and nor a parallel second item in the sentence.

In addition, the phrase exhibited on ... display is redundant as both words have the same meaning.

Incorrect.

This answer choice repeats the original grammatical mistake by incorrectly using the idiom both A and B. While both appears before the first item (both displayed on permanent exhibit...) there is neither and nor a parallel second item in the sentence.

In addition, the phrase displayed on .. exhibit is redundant as both words have the same meaning.

Well done!

This answer choice corrects the original idiom mistake by removing the word both. The sentence is now comprised of two clauses connected by yet:

The State Hermitage, ..., comprises ...

yet

a vast number of its treasures have never been ...

In addition, this answer choice corrects the original redundancy by changing objects exhibited on permanent display to objects on permanent display.

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the original redundancy, it repeats the original grammatical mistake by incorrectly using the idiom both A and B. While both appears before the first item (both on permanent display...) there is neither and nor a parallel second item in the sentence.

The State Hermitage, founded by Catherine the Great, comprises objects both exhibited on permanent display
The State Hermitage, which was founded by Catherine the Great, comprises objects both displayed permanently on exhibit
The State Hermitage, founded by Catherine the Great, comprises objects on permanent display
Founded by Catherine the Great, the State Hermitage, which comprises objects both in permanent exhibitions
The State Hermitage, founded by Catherine the Great, comprises objects both on permanent display