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Sentence Correction: Dangling Modifiers - Overview

Brought from the Americas by the Spaniards and quickly adapted for cultivation in Europe, the origins of maize were soon forgotten, many of its cultivators thinking it native to Turkey.

Incorrect.

This answer choice is grammatically incorrect. The sentence begins with a Dangling modifier: Brought from the Americas [...] which can only logically modify the noun maize. However, what immediately follows the modifier is the noun phrase the origins of maize.

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Incorrect.

This answer choice repeats the original Dangling Modifier mistake. The sentence begins with a Dangling modifier: Brought from the Americas [...] which can only logically modify the noun maize. However, what immediately follows the modifier is the noun phrase the origins of maize.

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Furthermore, this answer choice changes the adjective native to to the noun phrase a native of, making an incorrect use the idiom a native of. Only a human or an animal can be a native of X. However, both human and non-human nouns can be native to a place.

Incorrect.

This answer choice repeats the original Dangling Modifier mistake The sentence begins with a Dangling modifier: Brought from the Americas [...] which can only logically modify the noun maize. However, what immediately follows the modifier is the noun phrase maize's origins.

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Similarly, by changing the pronoun it to they, this answer choice makes the illogical claim that the origins were thought to be native to Turkey, rather than maize (the crop) being native to Turkey.

Incorrect.

This answer choice repeats the original Dangling Modifier mistake The sentence begins with a Dangling modifier: Brought from the Americas [...] which can only logically modify the noun maize. However, what immediately follows the modifier is the noun phrase many of the cultivators of maize.

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In addition, the phrase Turkey was its nativity is non-idiomatic and awkward. The word nativity refers only to the birth or origins of humans, not to the origins of non-human nouns.

Well done!

This answer choice corrects the Dangling Modifier mistake in the original question by placing maize directly after the modifier Brought from the Americas by the Spaniards and quickly adapted for cultivation in Europe.

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This answer choice also makes correct use of the idiom native to, which here means originating from or belonging to a place.

the origins of maize were soon forgotten, many of its cultivators thinking it native to Turkey
the origins of maize were soon forgotten, many of its cultivators thinking it was a native of Turkey
maize was thought by many of its cultivators to be native to Turkey and its origins were soon forgotten
maize's origins were soon forgotten, many of its cultivators thinking they were native to Turkey
many of the cultivators of maize soon forgot its origins and thought Turkey was its nativity