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Sentence Correction: Tenses - Past Simple and Progressive

Consistent application of rules by an administration, even if deciding on a case-by-case basis could lead to a preferred solution, guarantees exemption from accusations of partiality as are likely to arise.

Incorrect.

This answer choice is grammatically incorrect. The conjunction as (as are likely to arise) should be followed by a clause, but there is no subject in the following clause. Clauses that lack a subject are usually relative clauses (e.g. that are likely to arise).

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the original grammatical mistake, it is still grammatically incorrect. The Past Simple tense (guaranteed) is used to describe actions taken in the past, but this sentence presents a generalization, which should be described using Present Simple.

Incorrect.

Incorrect.

This answer choice repeats the original grammatical mistake. The conjunction as (as are bound to arise) should be followed by a clause, but there is no subject in the following clause. Clauses that lack a subject are usually relative clauses (e.g. that are bound to arise).

In addition, the pronoun it in the last part of the sentence is ambiguous as it can refer to both administration and application.

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the original grammatical mistake, it is still grammatically incorrect. First, the phrase preferable than is non-idiomatic. The correct idiom is preferable to. Than is mainly used in comparisons and should only follow a comparative (e.g. More preferable, greater, lower, etc.).

Correct.

This answer choice corrects the original grammatical mistake by using the relative pronoun that (accusations of impartiality that are bound to arise) instead of as.

Consistent application of rules by an administration, even if deciding on a case-by-case basis could lead to a preferred solution, guarantees exemption from accusations of partiality as are likely to arise
An administration that consistently applies rules, even if deciding on a case-by-case basis could lead to a preferred solution, guaranteed it will be exempt from accusations of partiality that are bound to arise
Consistent application of rules, even when deciding on a case-by-case basis could lead to a preferred solution, guarantees that an administration will be exempt from accusations of partiality that are bound to arise
Preferable than solutions based on case-by-case decisions, rules that are consistently applied by an administration are guaranteed to exempt it from accusations of partiality that are bound to arise
An administration's consistent application of rules is guaranteed to exempt it from accusations of partiality as are bound to arise, even if it could lead to a preferable solution to decide on a case-by-case basis