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Sentence Correction: Sentence vs. Clause vs. Fragment

Some scholars consider Nobel laureate Doris Lessing's The Golden Notebook a classic of feminist fiction, as opposed, the author herself has often remarked that its central theme is mental breakdown as a route to personal liberation.

Incorrect.

This answer choice is grammatically incorrect. The sentence's two clauses lack a connector (e,g, BUT) and are separated only by a comma, but a comma cannot connect clauses:

Some scholars consider Nobel laureate Doris Lessing's The Golden Notebook a classic of feminist fiction

as opposed, the author herself has often remarked that its central theme is mental breakdown as a route to personal liberation.

In addition, the phrase as opposed is non-idiomatic. The correct idiom is as opposed to.

Well done!

This answer choice corrects the Run-On Sentence mistake (clauses connected by comma only) by replacing the comma (,) that separates the two clauses with a semicolon (;), which can serve as a connector. It also corrects the idiom mistake by changing as opposed to as opposed to this view.

Although this answer choices adds the word view, this improves the clarity of the sentence without changing the meaning.

Note that consider is unique, in that it does not require any preposition after it. "They consider it a classic" is grammatically correct and more concise than "they consider it as / to be a classic".

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the original idiom mistake by changing as opposed to as opposed to, it is illogical. The modifier as opposed to the author herself should logically modify Some scholars but it is placed directly after feminist fiction.

Furthermore, this answer choice is stylistically flawed. Consider is unique, in that it does not require any preposition after it. "They consider it a classic" is grammatically correct and more concise than "they consider it as / to be a classic".

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the original Run-On Sentence mistake (clauses connected by comma only), it introduces a new mistake: the expression opposite are is non-idiomatic. The correct idiom is as opposed to. 

Furthermore, this answer choice is stylistically flawedConsider is unique, in that it does not require any preposition after it. "They consider it a classic" is grammatically correct and more concise than "they consider it as / to be a classic".

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the original idiom mistake by changing as opposed to as opposed to, it is illogical. The modifier as opposed to the remarks of the author herself should compare the author's remarks with those of Some scholars; however, it is placed directly after feminist fiction creating an illogical comparison.

Furthermore, this answer choice is stylistically flawedConsider is unique, in that it does not require any preposition after it. "They consider it a classic" is grammatically correct and more concise than "they consider it as / to be a classic".

a classic of feminist fiction, as opposed, the author herself has often remarked
a classic of feminist fiction; as opposed to this view, the author herself has often remarked
as a classic of feminist fiction, as opposed to the author herself, who has often remarked
to be a classic of feminist fiction, but, opposite are the author's own frequent remarks
to be a classic of feminist fiction, as opposed to the remarks of the author herself