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Sentence Correction: Sentence vs. Clause vs. Fragment

Born in Mainz in the late 14th century, Johannes Gutenberg is widely known as the inventor of mechanical movable type; his ingenious printing press technology - made obsolete only by the advent of the digital era - was more influential than any inventor of his age.

Incorrect.

This answer choice is illogical. The Comparative construction requires that the things compared be logically comparable.

This answer choice illogically compares between an invention (his ingenious printing press technology) and an inventor (any inventor of his age). 

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Well done!

This answer choice corrects the Comparative mistake in the original question by using the pronoun that to refer to the first item in the comparison. By changing than any inventor to than that of any other the corrected sentence logically compares Gutenberg's invention to the invention of any other contemporary inventor. 

[[snippet]]

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the logic of the Comparative construction in the original question by using the pronoun that to refer to the first item in the comparison, it is grammatically incorrect. By removing the conjugated verb was, the corrected sentence's second clause becomes a fragment, as the subject his ingenious printing press technology is left without a conjugatedverb.

Incorrect.

This answer choice is illogical. The Comparative construction requires that the things compared be logically comparable.

This answer choice illogically compares between an invention (his ingenious printing press technology) and an inventor (any inventor of his age). 

[[snippet]]

Also, the phrase 'had more influence' is awkward and stylistically inferior to "was more influential".

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the Comparative mistake in the original question, it is illogical.

This answer choice corrects the Comparative mistake in the original question by using the pronoun that to refer to the first item in the comparison. By changing than any inventor to than that of any the corrected sentence logically compares Gutenberg's invention to the invention of any contemporary inventor.

However, the corrected sentence is still illogical - for another reason. The printing press is now compared to inventions by any inventors of Gutenberg's age - including Gutenberg himself. This makes no sense, as the printing press technology cannot be more influential than itself. It can only be compared to inventions of any other inventor.

was more influential than any
was more influential than that of any other
more influential than that of any other
had more influence than any other
was more influential than that of any