Don’t lose your progress!

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Up to 90+ points GMAT score improvement guarantee

The best guarantee you’ll find

Our Premium and Ultimate plans guarantee up to 90+ points score increase or your money back.

Master each section of the test

Comprehensive GMAT prep

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Schedule-free studying

Learn on the go

Study whenever and wherever you want with our iOS and Android mobile apps.

The most effective way to study

Personalized GMAT prep, just for you!

Adaptive learning technology focuses on your academic weaknesses.

Sentence Correction: Sentence vs. Clause vs. Fragment

Osteopathic medicine shares with allopathic medicine the same assumptions about the biomedical constitution of the individual but the difference is that the former emphasizes a holistic approach to treatment through the manipulation of the musculo-skeletal system.

Incorrect.

While this answer choice is grammatically correct it is stylistically flawed and redundant. The contrast between the two medical systems is expressed through two separate clauses, although this could be stated more concisely in one clause.

The use of a new subject in the second clause the difference (is that, etc.) is an awkward way of developing the idea in the second part of the sentence, because we do not know the difference between what two items is being described until we reach the words the former.

[[snippet]]

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

While this answer choice is grammatically correct and concise, it is illogical.

By eliminating the second clause (but the difference is) and using the verb differs, the corrected sentence creates a concise sentence and correct parallelism with the use of the verbs shares and differs.

However, since the subject of the sentence is the first noun appearing in the sentence, the corrected sentence is saying that Osteopathic medicine...differs from the former (=the first in a list of two). Clearly, it is illogical to say that Osteopathic medicine...differs from itself.

This sentence uses the idiom: A differs from B in C. This idiom describes the characteristic C of A which makes it different from B.

Example: Jane differs from John in her fondness for cats.

Meaning: Jane is fond of cats, but John is not fond of them.

Example: The GMAT differs from the GRE in its focus on business.

Meaning: The GMAT focuses on business, but the GRE does not.

Incorrect.

This answer choice is illogical and confusing.

[[snippet]]

Changing but the difference to and is different confuses the logic of the original sentence which is based on a contrast.

In addition, the corrected sentence is illogical. Since the subject of the corrected sentence is Osteopathic medicine, it doesn't make sense to say Osteopathic medicine...is different in the former emphasizing, etc.  The correct idiom for expressing difference is x is different from y. The corrected sentence does not tell us what Osteopathic medicine is different from, but only how it is different (it is different in...emphasizing).

Well done!

This answer choice is grammatically correct, logical and stylistically preferable to all other answer choices.

By eliminating the second clause (but the difference is) and using the verb differs, the corrected sentence creates a concise sentence and correct parallelism with the use of the verbs shares and differs. Although the word former is changed to latter, this answer choice preserves the meaning and logic of the original sentence: Osteopathic medicine...differs from the latter (from the second item in the list, i.e. allopathic medicine).

This sentence uses the idiom: A differs from B in C. This idiom describes the characteristic C of A which makes it different from B.

Example: Jane differs from John in her fondness for cats.

Meaning: Jane is fond of cats, but John is not fond of them.

Example: The GMAT differs from the GRE in its focus on business.

Meaning: The GMAT focuses on business, but the GRE does not.

Although this answer choice contains an ambiguity (the pronoun its can technically refer to either types of medicine mentioned previously in the sentence), the grammatical correctness, conciseness, clarity, and proper use of the idiom make this answer choice the best one among the rest.

Incorrect.

This answer choice is grammatically incorrect and stylistically flawed. By changing the difference is to being different the second clause (beginning after but) becomes a fragment which lacks a conjugated verb. Since what comes before the word but is a clause, what follows should also be a clause, thus there is also a parallelism problem.

In addition, being is an awkward expression that is often incorrect on the GMAT.

[[snippet]]
but the difference is that the former emphasizes
but differs from the former in its emphasis on
but differs from the latter in its emphasis on
and is different in the former emphasizing
but being different from the former, as it emphasizes