Don’t lose your progress!

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Up to 90+ points GMAT score improvement guarantee

The best guarantee you’ll find

Our Premium and Ultimate plans guarantee up to 90+ points score increase or your money back.

Master each section of the test

Comprehensive GMAT prep

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Schedule-free studying

Learn on the go

Study whenever and wherever you want with our iOS and Android mobile apps.

The most effective way to study

Personalized GMAT prep, just for you!

Adaptive learning technology focuses on your academic weaknesses.

Sentence Correction: Subject Verb Agreement Questions - Overview

In the mental health field, the term schizophrenic applies to patients diagnosed with a psychiatric illness whose symptoms include auditory hallucinations and delusional thoughts, while in common parlance it is people who have a split personality.

Incorrect.

This answer choice is illogical. The subject of the sentence is the term schizophrenic, not an actual schizophrenic. However, the term cannot be a schizophrenic. We cannot say that a word or term is something or other, but a word or term can refer to/define/describe something or other.

[[snippet]]

Very Good.

This answer choice corrects the pronoun mistake in the original sentence, by changing the phrase it is people who have to it refers to someone who has.

[[snippet]]

Although this answer choice seems to involve a slight meaning change by replacing the plural subject people, with the singular subject someone, it is the only answer choice that is both grammatically correct and logical and both a person and people essentially deal with people in general, thus both words can be utilized here without a real change in meaning.

Incorrect.

This answer choice is illogical. The subject of the first clause, to which the pronoun it refers, is the term schizophrenic, not an actual schizophrenic. However, the term cannot be a schizophrenic. We cannot say that a word or term is something or other, but a word or term can refer to/define/describe something or other.

[[snippet]]

Incorrect.

This answer choice is both grammatically incorrect and illogical. By replacing the pronoun it with the noun phrase such a patient, on the purely technical level, the corrected sentence resolves the grammatical ambiguity of the pronoun it, which can refer to any of the preceding singular nouns: field, schizophrenic, patient, or illness. However, this change actually creates two new mistakes.

First of all, the plural verb have does not agree with the singular subject patient, making the sentence grammatically incorrect

Second, the sentence is telling us something about the term schizophrenic, not about an actual schizophrenic or mental health patient. Substituting the phrase such a patient for the pronoun it, which refers to the term schizophrenic, is illogical

[[snippet]]

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the pronoun mistake and logical mistake in the original sentence by replacing the phrase it is, with it means, it creates another logical mistake. A schizophrenic is a person suffering from a psychiatric disorder; it is not the action of having the symptoms of the disorder. We cannot say that the term schizophrenic...means to have a split personality.

Note that this sentence is grammatically correct but logically mistaken.

[[snippet]]
it is people who have
it refers to someone who has
it is a person who has
such a patient have
it means to have