Don’t lose your progress!

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Up to 90+ points GMAT score improvement guarantee

The best guarantee you’ll find

Our Premium and Ultimate plans guarantee up to 90+ points score increase or your money back.

Master each section of the test

Comprehensive GMAT prep

We cover every section of the GMAT with in-depth lessons, 5000+ practice questions and realistic practice tests.

Schedule-free studying

Learn on the go

Study whenever and wherever you want with our iOS and Android mobile apps.

The most effective way to study

Personalized GMAT prep, just for you!

Adaptive learning technology focuses on your academic weaknesses.

Sentence Correction: Relative Clauses - Choosing the Correct Relative Pronoun

Remains of Mycenae, first unearthed in 1841 by Greek archeologist Kyriakos Pittakis, which restored the monumental Lion's Gate, reveals its former glory as a royal seat of power in the ancient Mediterranean world.

Incorrect.

This answer choice is grammatically incorrect. The singular verb reveals does not agree with the plural subject Remains of Mycenae. In addition, the relative pronoun which cannot begin a relative clause that modifies a human noun.  

Also, this sentence is stylistically flawed, because the pronoun its is ambiguous. It can refer either to Mycenae or to the monumental Lion's Gate.

[[snippet]]

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the Subject Verb Agreement mistake in the original question by changing the singular verb reveals in the present tense to revealed in the past tense (singular/plural), it repeats the relative pronoun mistake in the original sentence.

The relative pronoun which cannot begin a relative clause that modifies a human noun. Changing the conjugated verb restored to the noun restoration does not eliminate the grammatical error, because the relative clause requires a conjugated verb, without which, the sentence is a fragment and not a full sentence,

In addition, this sentence is stylistically flawed, because the pronoun its is ambiguous. It can refer either to Mycenae or to the monumental Lion's Gate.

[[snippet]]

Well done!

This answer choice corrects the Subject Verb Agreement mistake in the original sentence, by changing the singular verb reveals to the plural verb reveal. It also corrects the pronoun mistake by changing the pronoun which, to who, which correctly modifies a relative clause referring to a human subject, here: Greek archeologist Kyriakos Pittakis.

Note also that this answer choice is stylistically superior to the original sentence. By changing the pronoun its to the city's it eliminates the ambiguity of the pronoun its, which can refer either to the Lion's Gate, or to Mycenae.

[[snippet]]

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the pronoun mistake in the original sentence, by changing the pronoun which to who, it introduces another grammatical mistake by turning the sentence into a fragment.

In the corrected sentence, the verbal phrase and also revealed is separated from what comes before it by a connector and (and not by a comma, as in the original sentence). As a result, the verb revealed becomes part of the relative clause that begins with the words who restored, etc. Since reveal is no longer the sentence's main verb, the meaning of the corrected sentence also changes: the verb revealed now refers to Greek archeologist rather than to Remains of Mycenae.

Also, with the verb revealed expanding the relative clause, the main sentence becomes a fragment as the subject Remains lacks a conjugated verb.

Notice how this grammatical mistake also involves a change in meaning.

[[snippet]]

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the Subject Verb Agreement mistake in the original sentence, by changing the singular verb reveals to the plural verb reveal, and corrects the stylistic flaw of ambiguity, by replacing the pronoun its with the city's, it repeats the original relative pronoun mistake.

Remember that the relative pronoun which cannot begin a relative clause that modifies a human noun.

What helps us identify this question as a Relative Clause question, as well as identify the mistake is the following Stop Sign:

who, which, that, whose, whom

The correct choice of relative pronoun is influenced by several factors. In some cases, as in who, whom and which, the choice depends on whether the relative clause describes humans (who, whom) or non humans (which).

which restored the monumental Lion's Gate, reveals its former glory as a royal seat of power in
which restoration of the monumental Lion's Gate, revealed its former glory as a royal seat of power in
who restored the monumental Lion's Gate, reveal the city's former glory as a royal seat of power in
who restored the monumental Lion's Gate and also revealed the former glory of a powerful royal seat of
which restored the monumental Lion's Gate, reveal the city's former glory as a royal seat