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Critical Reasoning: Boldface Type Questions

Air bags have become a staple for every new car on the market. The fast rate at which they were incorporated into the new models of most manufacturers attests to the rapidity at which their significance was perceived. A new Japanese car manufacturer has concluded that if he wishes his cars to be considered safe, he must also incorporate air bags in the vehicles he plans to put on the market.

In the argument given, the two portions in boldface play which of the following roles?

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

The first boldface part is not an assumption - it's a fact, a premise. You can immediately eliminate answer choices that incorrectly define the first boldface part; do not waste time reading the rest.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

The first boldface part is not a conclusion - it's a fact, a premise. You can immediately eliminate answer choices that incorrectly define the first boldface part; do not waste time reading the rest.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

While this answer choice defines the first boldface part correctly, it defines the second incorrectly. The second boldfaced piece tells us that a Japanese car manufacturer has decided to follow the trend described in the first premise. His judgement, or conclusion, cannot therefore be considered contrary to the evidence in the first premise.

Incorrect.

[[snippet]]

The first boldface part is not an inference, which is just another word for conclusion - it's a fact, a premise. You can immediately eliminate answer choices that incorrectly define the first boldface part; do not waste time reading the rest.

Good work!

[[snippet]]

The first boldface part is indeed a fact or a piece of information, i.e., a premise, and the second is the conclusion of the argument.

The first is an assumption; the second is the conclusion of the argument.
Both the first and the second are the conclusions of the argument.
The first is a piece of evidence; the second is a judgement which is contrary to that piece of evidence.
The first is an inference; the second is a conclusion.
The first is a piece of information; the second is the conclusion of the argument.